Manchester Histories Festival

A Sneak Peak of The Lapsed Clubber Audio Map

Monday 11 December 2017

The team behind the Lapsed Clubber project are thrilled to release a sneak preview of the Lapsed Clubber audio map.LapsedClubber Map 

When the map launches, you will be able to drop pins to represent your favourite Manchester club nights, venues or rave locations and say a bit about them. The map will mainly feature audio memories which Lapsed Clubbers will be able to record straight into the map tagged under specific locations and topics. We have 6 tags which you will be able to tag your memory under. And each of these tags can be browsed as well as added to. These are: Music Clothes Drugs Community Politics Body Mind Life-changing events The map will sit on its own section on the MDMArchive website. Anybody can browse the map. To add memories, you will need to make a user with MDMArchive. So what are you waiting for? It's always good to be prepared! We will finalise the map over the course of the project and it will be officially launched on 9th June with Manchester Histories Festival in a full day event about Manchester's music histories. Public events will collect data and memories which will shape the development of the map and our workshop and training sessions will allow LapsedClubbers themselves to work directly on the map and the data.

Do know about DJs, EDM and strawberries? Please email thelapserclubber@mmu.ac.uk to volunteer.

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Introducing The Lapsed Clubber project!

Saturday 2 December 2017

Introducing The Lapsed Clubber project!

The Lapsed Clubber project is a Heritage Lottery Funded project The Lapsed Clubber based  at Manchester Metropolitan University and run by Dr Beate Peter.

Although Manchester and its popular music are famous around the globe, little is known about the communities that helped create that reputation. Popular culture has referenced rave culture in Greater Manchester in print, in major films, on TV and in theatre, but almost always from the perspective of the well-known expert insider. Focusing on the raving landscape between 1985 and 1995, we will create an interactive and online Lapsed Clubber Heritage Map with community input, giving the community the opportunity to write their own rave history.

The map will be housed on the MDMArchives website and will give users the chance to read, listen to memories and reminisce about the 85-95 clubbing era. Users will also have the opportunity to record and add their own memories to the map.

Over the course of the project, which began in June 2017 and will end with the launch of the map in June 2018 as part of the Manchester Histories Festival, we will have several workshop and training events for community participants and knowledgeable Lapsed Clubbers. At these workshops, you will have the opportunity to make a direct impact on the final project.

Our next workshop session will focus on Working with Archives. Heritage expert Heather Roberts will teach basic tips and tricks about finding online sources and how to navigate them. We will then be searching online archives to find footage, photographs and other material in order to write our own clubbing history. The material we find will be used directly in the upcoming Manchester’s Clubbing Histories event on January 13th 2018. You can book onto the session here: lapsed-clubber-archives.eventbrite.co.uk

The Lapsed Clubber Archive

You can see our full schedule of events here, and details will be confirmed as the project progresses, so watch this space! Get involved and volunteer by emailing thelapsedclubber@mmu.ac.uk.

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Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Manchester People First

Tuesday 7 November 2017

In a matter of days you’ll be able to learn about so many hidden histories with our Archives+ Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition. One particular group who are sharing their impressive journey of a quarter century is Manchester People First. This blog gives a sneak peek at their exhibition that tells the story of their ambitious origins will hopefully inspire your own future.

Manchester People FirstThis photograph shows the original committee from 1992 when they had their first meeting. Their aim was to change the experiences of learning disabled adults in Manchester for the better, by encouraging self-advocacy and speaking up. From the people on this small couch has grown a force of over 500 members, all working to make a difference in their own and others’ lives.

The successes they have had and the amazing spirit of the organisation and its members is celebrated in their exhibition. Learn about how they’ve tackled political reform head on and more.

The Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition runs from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 at Archives+ with a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November, which everyone is welcome to attend.

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Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: M13 Youth Project exhibition

Tuesday 31 October 2017

Not long now until we can share the amazing work done by our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians groups. One of our fantastic groups that have so much to tell you is the wonderful M13 Youth Project. Here’s a sneak peek of their exhibition telling one of their most important stories: how they came about.

In 1995 Helen Gatenby wanted to make a solid impact supporting local people in her area. After years of hard work, funding was finally won to do some real ground work and make a difference. The meat and potatoes activity of M13 Youth Project was started: detached work. Listen to young people, being with young people, going out and meeting young people on the streets of Brunswick and surrounding areas.

To this day, this is one of the most important and valued activities M13 undertakes. All of their other projects and plans in their proud history and ambitious future are based off this simple but effective work ethic.

M13

Learn more about what they’ve done in their quarter century and what impact they’ve made and perhaps be inspired to make an impact yourself, by visiting their exhibition at Archives+ soon.

The Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition runs from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 at Archives+ with a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November, which everyone is welcome to attend.

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Joint statement from Cultural organisations in Manchester

Monday 30 October 2017

As a sector we have been saddened and horrified by the number of #metoo experiences shared by friends and colleagues over the past week. We want to be clear to all staff and artists working in the cultural sector in Manchester that we will not tolerate harassment or abuse in any of our venues or organisations. We want to assure all women that if they have experienced abuse or harassment, of any kind, they will be listened to, taken seriously and appropriate action will be taken.

We ask that all our colleagues familiarise themselves with the dignity at work and whistleblowing polices of organisations you work with and in. If you do not feel comfortable reporting inappropriate behaviour through the routes outlined in these policies, there is help available.

ACAS www.acas.org.uk provides impartial and confidential advice for employers and employees.

There are also sector-specific organisations who can help.

a-n The Artists Information Company – for visual artists www.a-n.co.uk

BECTU – for technical staff www.bectu.org.uk

Equity – for actors, singers and dancers www.equity.org.uk

Musicians’ Union – for musicians www.musiciansunion.org.uk

Independent Theatre Council – for theatre practitioners www.itc-arts.org

Writers’ Guild – for writers www.writersguild.org.uk

Museums Association – for museum professionals www.museumsassociation.org

While the #metoo response has been about sexual abuse and harassment of women, we would like to take this opportunity to state that abuse, harassment, bullying or discrimination, of any kind, will not be tolerated in any of our venues or organisations.

We stand together against harassment, discrimination and abuse

Signed

Amanda Sutton, Venture Arts

Amanda Wallace, Manchester Art Gallery

Dave Moutrey, Sheena Wrigley, HOME

Bryony Bell, The Stoller Hall

Debra King, Brighter Sound

Deb Ashby, Dance Manchester

Ed Connole, All FM

Erika Rushton, Islington Mill

Janine Waters, The Edge

John McGrath, Manchester International Festival

John Summers, Andy Ryans, The Halle

Julia Davis, Commonword/Cultureword

Karen Shannon, Manchester Histories

Kasper de Graaf, Design Manchester

Linda Merrick, RNCM

Liz O’Neill, Z-Arts

Mark Dobson, Sarah Frankcom Royal Exchange

Matt Fenton, Contact

Nicholas Merriman, Manchester Museum, the Whitworth

Rachael Turner, MadLab

Renny O’Shea, Richard Gregory, Quarantine

Steve Mead, EJ Trivett, Manchester Jazz Festival

Sue McLoughlin, Chethams Library

The Edge, Theatre and Arts Centre

Zoe Dunbar, Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Oldham Youth Council exhibition sneak peek

Tuesday 24 October 2017

From mid-November you will have the marvellous opportunity to reap the benefits of the achievements of our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians project. The exhibitions go live at Archives+ from the 11th November and we are so excited to share them with you.

Oldham Youth Council Oldham Youth Council, one of the project groups, used the opportunity to explore how Oldham has become so richly diverse. For a sneak peek at their exhibition, we’ve chosen one of Roshni’s stories about her ancestors and their journey.

This beautiful photograph of Roshnis’ grandmother is part of the story of her mother’s family’s journey to Oldham from Gujarat via railway building in British East Africa and then to London. Industry, craft, fashion, catering, academia and entrepreneurial endeavours brought the family to Oldham in the 1970s.

Learn about her family’s stories and many more in Oldham Youth Council’s Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition at Archives+ from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 and join us for a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November.

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Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Inspire Centre

Tuesday 24 October 2017

Ahead of our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition at Archives+ we wanted to share with you this lovely contribution from one of the community groups, the Inspire Centre.

Inspire BlogInspire Centre in Levenshulme is a vibrant community hub which for many years has served as a key place of worship and connectivity for the local community. In the exhibition, see how the building used to look in the early 1900s, what happened during its transformation and the legacy it is creating for the future history of Levenshulme and Greater Manchester.

In a heart-warming video in the exhibition, this member of Inspire shares his memories of how the building used to look when he was growing up in the area.

Do you remember the light through the trees as it shone in through the beautiful windows?

Be inspired by Inspire’s history and future through their colourful and proud exhibition at Archives+, launching soon.

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians is a Manchester Histories project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Manchester Histories have been working with communities across Greater Manchester with the aim of revealing less familiar histories and heritage; that is to say, the histories of the people, buildings, families, communities and places that make up our lives. These histories can become ‘hidden’ because they are not always recorded, nevertheless, these important social histories often shape us and the places we live, and Manchester Histories are thrilled to be supporting people across Greater Manchester to uncover their own histories. Over the the last year we have been working with five community groups, plus, with the help of experts, we have developed an informative series of toolkits that aim to equip anybody with the skills they need to begin researching and creating their own archives.

The Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition runs from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 at Archives+ with a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November, which everyone is welcome to attend.

Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Cosgrove Hall Films Exhibition

Sunday 15 October 2017

Ahead of the opening of the Cosgrove Hall Films Exhibition at the Waterside Arts Centre, we invited the exhibitors curator, Georgia Taylor Aguilar to write a guest post for the Manchester Histories blog.

 Danger Mouse

This exhibition celebrates animations created by Cosgrove Hall Films by delving into their archive, which has recently relocated to Waterside Arts Centre in Sale, Manchester. Curating this exhibition has been a wonderful opportunity to reveal the hidden workings and methods behind popular animated television programs such as Dangermouse, Wind in the Willows, Truckers, and many more. Selecting from hundreds of individual items has been a challenging process because everyone has favourites; the exhibition contains items from animations spanning the life of Cosgrove Hall Films. The animation process has been just as important to exhibit, with developmental drawings to puppets, and moulds to armatures. This exhibition highlights hidden processes of a significant British animation studio, with favourite characters seen by four generations of viewers.

During the 1960s, Brian Cosgrove and Mark Hall worked in the graphics department for Granada Television. The pair were keen to set up their own animation company working with both drawn (cel) animation and stop-motion puppetry, so while Brian continued work at Granada around 1970, Mark spent a year establishing their company – Stop Frame Animations.Due to the success of Rainbow films, which Stop Frame Animations worked on in partnership with Thames Television, a subsidiary studio was created. With Brian Cosgrove and Mark Hall as the new directors and lead animators, Cosgrove Hall Films was created.The studios opened in May 1976 in a converted tobacco warehouse in Chorlton-cum-Hardy. This location bore the name of their first successful series Chorlton and the Wheelies (ITV 1976-79).

Since the creation of Cosgrove Hall Films, they have created many popular favourites spanning four generations of audiences. Danger Mouse aired from 1981 to 1987, and was an early success, so much so that a spin-off was created following Count Duckula (a vegetarian vampire duck). Through syndication in the United States on the Nickelodeon network during the 1980s and 90s, Danger Mouse became an international hit. Westley Wood, former development producer of Cosgrove Hall Films, feels that in relation to Manchester - “Danger Mouse should be our Mickey Mouse, an icon of the city. People don’t realise the significance of Cosgrove Hall, yet it actually came before Aardman and is arguably the crown jewel of UK animation.”[1] After spending much time with the nostalgic Cosgrove Hall films archive during the curation process, it has been impossible not to fall in love with these wonderful characters.

Stiletto, Dangermouse cartoon

Stiletto, Dangermouse cartoon - Cosgrove Hall Films Archive, Waterside Arts Centre

Wind in the Willows has been another popular favourite, with many tuning in to watch the weekly instalment of Toad, Badger, Ratty and Mole and their encounters with the cunning Weasels. I have been stunned at the detail in which the props, costumes, and figures have been fabricated. For example, in a side pocket of Toad’s backpack exists is a miniature bottle of champagne filled with an iridescent liquid to mimic an infinite stream of bubbles. In an interview with Barry Purves, who was the steady hand behind Toad, notes the joys of animators is the detail – to make every single thing mean something. He comments that animation is a performance through the hands, for example – how do you get a toad to listen when he has no ears?


Engie Benjy set - Cosgrove Hall Films Archive, Waterside Arts Centre

As well as original content, Engie Benjy setCosgrove Hall Films were part of several re-makes such as Postman Pat, Noddy in Toyland, and Bill and Ben the Flowerpot Men. Thirty years at the Chorlton studios came to an end in 2008, when only four members of staff remained and moved ‘in house’ to Granada Television (ITV). The studios were sold and demolished between 2010 and 2012.



Bill and Ben Bill and Ben - Cosgrove Hall Films Archive, Waterside Arts Centre Photo: Jason Lock

Their spectacular skills and attention to detail combined with creative problem solving at its best ensured nothing less than living characters in the Cosgrove Hall kingdom. It seems incredible that for earlier works, they had one shot using 16mm film to get it right, compared with the liberty of current editing and post-production processes. Despite exponential advances in animation during and since the work of Cosgrove Hall films, this particular studio was crucial in paving the way for the development of animations, methods and individuals; whose talent has graced our screens for further years.

[1] Westley Wood, ‘Remember Danger Mouse? Help save the archive of Cosgrove Hall’ https://confidentials.com/manchester/cosgrove-hall-manchester-archive-animation [accessed 10th October 2017]

Animation City presents The Cosgrove Hall Films Exhibition at the Waterside Arts Centre, 1 Waterside Plaza, Sale, M33 7ZF from at Saturday 21 October 2017 to Saturday 17 February 2018.

FREE ENTRY

watersideartscentre.co.uk

@WatersideArts

#CosgroveHallArchive

Guest Blog by Georgia Taylor Aguilar @georgiataylora

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Bring Manchester’s Suffragette Banner Home

Sunday 27 August 2017

www.crowdfunder.co.uk/bring-manchesters-suffragette-banner-home

The People’s History Museum is calling on supporters to help it bring home to Manchester a significant and rare suffragette banner that was created over 100 years ago at the height of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) campaign led by Emmeline Pankhurst.  Our Crowdfunder campaign to bring Manchester’s suffragette banner home will help save, lovingly conserve and display the banner for all to see. The People’s History Museum has already secured grants from the Arts Council England/V&A Purchase Grant Fund and the Heritage Lottery Fund’s Collecting Cultures programme. We are now seeking to raise the final £5,000 with our Crowdfunder campaign to bring the banner home to Manchester.

If the campaign is successful, the banner will form the centrepiece of our 2018 programme marking the centenary of the Representation of the People Act 1918 that afforded all men and some women the right to vote. Synonymous with many groups’ mass demonstrations throughout history, banners of all kinds are one of the iconic sights at mass protests. The WSPU were no different and banners like this one were ever present at their trailblazing campaigns but sadly very few have survived and today they are very rare.Suffrage Banner

Having been unearthed from a Leeds charity shop cupboard, where it spent the last ten years hidden away, the Manchester suffragette banner has finally made its way into the public eye. Its journey to Leeds began in the 1930s when its then owner, Edna White, moved to the city and after her death it was donated to the charity shop. Leading with the words ‘First in the Fight’ under the headline of ‘Manchester’, the banner represents a truly unique piece of Mancunian history. Indeed, the banner still has an original label displaying the name of Thomas Brown & Sons, a renowned regalia manufacturer based here in its rightful home of Manchester.

The People’s History Museum houses one of the largest collections of trade union and political banners in the world. Its expertise includes an in-house Textile Conservation Studio which is dedicated to looking after the museum’s collection. If successful, the campaign will ensure that the banner not only becomes part of the People’s History Museum collection, but will also make sure that it can be enjoyed by visitors for generations to come.

Please help us reach our target by visiting our Crowdfunder page, pledging and sharing as far and wide as you can. The campaign runs until Monday 18 September 2017 and there are opportunities at all levels for supporters to become involved with the People’s History Museum’s plans for 2018.

Guest Blog by People's History Museum. @PHMMcr



Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Visit to Manchester Central Library

Wednesday 7 June 2017

In the latest edition of our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians Blog project, M13 Youth Project have written a guest post for us:

Our first session of the hidden histories projects involved us visiting M13 Youth Project at Central Library the library and seeing how and where the hidden histories project will be portrayed. This allowed us to get as creative as possible and set free our imagination on how we show our audience about M13’s history. We were able to see how other groups showed videos, objects, audio clips and pictures of the story they were telling.

We were also able to visit the physical archives, gaining VIP access to view very old books in the library. It was very interesting to look through the books, with some of them being from as early as 15th and 16th century. One young person mentioned how: “keeping historical records gives people from the now and future a glimpse to understanding how life was like back then, and maybe in 100yrs time people will look at the history and great stuff M13 have done.”

From the day, our young people expressed their enthusiasm to begin finding, creating images and videos that accurately illustrate M13 youth project and its history over the years.

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians is a Manchester Histories project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The project will see Manchester Histories working with communities across Greater Manchester with the aim of revealing less familiar histories and heritage; that is to say, the histories of the people, buildings, families, communities and places that make up our lives. These histories can become ‘hidden’ because they are not always recorded, nevertheless, these important social histories often shape us and the places we live, and Manchester Histories are thrilled to be supporting people across Greater Manchester to uncover their own histories. Over the coming months we'll be working with five community groups, plus, with the help of experts, we're developing an informative series of toolkits that will to equip anybody with the skills they need to begin researching and creating their own archives.



Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

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