Manchester Histories Festival

Posts tagged Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Manchester People First

Tuesday 7 November 2017

In a matter of days you’ll be able to learn about so many hidden histories with our Archives+ Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition. One particular group who are sharing their impressive journey of a quarter century is Manchester People First. This blog gives a sneak peek at their exhibition that tells the story of their ambitious origins will hopefully inspire your own future.

Manchester People FirstThis photograph shows the original committee from 1992 when they had their first meeting. Their aim was to change the experiences of learning disabled adults in Manchester for the better, by encouraging self-advocacy and speaking up. From the people on this small couch has grown a force of over 500 members, all working to make a difference in their own and others’ lives.

The successes they have had and the amazing spirit of the organisation and its members is celebrated in their exhibition. Learn about how they’ve tackled political reform head on and more.

The Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition runs from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 at Archives+ with a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November, which everyone is welcome to attend.

Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: M13 Youth Project exhibition

Tuesday 31 October 2017

Not long now until we can share the amazing work done by our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians groups. One of our fantastic groups that have so much to tell you is the wonderful M13 Youth Project. Here’s a sneak peek of their exhibition telling one of their most important stories: how they came about.

In 1995 Helen Gatenby wanted to make a solid impact supporting local people in her area. After years of hard work, funding was finally won to do some real ground work and make a difference. The meat and potatoes activity of M13 Youth Project was started: detached work. Listen to young people, being with young people, going out and meeting young people on the streets of Brunswick and surrounding areas.

To this day, this is one of the most important and valued activities M13 undertakes. All of their other projects and plans in their proud history and ambitious future are based off this simple but effective work ethic.

M13

Learn more about what they’ve done in their quarter century and what impact they’ve made and perhaps be inspired to make an impact yourself, by visiting their exhibition at Archives+ soon.

The Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition runs from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 at Archives+ with a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November, which everyone is welcome to attend.

Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Oldham Youth Council exhibition sneak peek

Tuesday 24 October 2017

From mid-November you will have the marvellous opportunity to reap the benefits of the achievements of our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians project. The exhibitions go live at Archives+ from the 11th November and we are so excited to share them with you.

Oldham Youth Council Oldham Youth Council, one of the project groups, used the opportunity to explore how Oldham has become so richly diverse. For a sneak peek at their exhibition, we’ve chosen one of Roshni’s stories about her ancestors and their journey.

This beautiful photograph of Roshnis’ grandmother is part of the story of her mother’s family’s journey to Oldham from Gujarat via railway building in British East Africa and then to London. Industry, craft, fashion, catering, academia and entrepreneurial endeavours brought the family to Oldham in the 1970s.

Learn about her family’s stories and many more in Oldham Youth Council’s Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition at Archives+ from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 and join us for a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November.

Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Inspire Centre

Tuesday 24 October 2017

Ahead of our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition at Archives+ we wanted to share with you this lovely contribution from one of the community groups, the Inspire Centre.

Inspire BlogInspire Centre in Levenshulme is a vibrant community hub which for many years has served as a key place of worship and connectivity for the local community. In the exhibition, see how the building used to look in the early 1900s, what happened during its transformation and the legacy it is creating for the future history of Levenshulme and Greater Manchester.

In a heart-warming video in the exhibition, this member of Inspire shares his memories of how the building used to look when he was growing up in the area.

Do you remember the light through the trees as it shone in through the beautiful windows?

Be inspired by Inspire’s history and future through their colourful and proud exhibition at Archives+, launching soon.

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians is a Manchester Histories project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Manchester Histories have been working with communities across Greater Manchester with the aim of revealing less familiar histories and heritage; that is to say, the histories of the people, buildings, families, communities and places that make up our lives. These histories can become ‘hidden’ because they are not always recorded, nevertheless, these important social histories often shape us and the places we live, and Manchester Histories are thrilled to be supporting people across Greater Manchester to uncover their own histories. Over the the last year we have been working with five community groups, plus, with the help of experts, we have developed an informative series of toolkits that aim to equip anybody with the skills they need to begin researching and creating their own archives.

The Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians exhibition runs from 11th November 2017 until 31st January 2018 at Archives+ with a special launch event from 3pm-5pm on Saturday 11th November, which everyone is welcome to attend.

Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Visit to Manchester Central Library

Wednesday 7 June 2017

In the latest edition of our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians Blog project, M13 Youth Project have written a guest post for us:

Our first session of the hidden histories projects involved us visiting M13 Youth Project at Central Library the library and seeing how and where the hidden histories project will be portrayed. This allowed us to get as creative as possible and set free our imagination on how we show our audience about M13’s history. We were able to see how other groups showed videos, objects, audio clips and pictures of the story they were telling.

We were also able to visit the physical archives, gaining VIP access to view very old books in the library. It was very interesting to look through the books, with some of them being from as early as 15th and 16th century. One young person mentioned how: “keeping historical records gives people from the now and future a glimpse to understanding how life was like back then, and maybe in 100yrs time people will look at the history and great stuff M13 have done.”

From the day, our young people expressed their enthusiasm to begin finding, creating images and videos that accurately illustrate M13 youth project and its history over the years.

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians is a Manchester Histories project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The project will see Manchester Histories working with communities across Greater Manchester with the aim of revealing less familiar histories and heritage; that is to say, the histories of the people, buildings, families, communities and places that make up our lives. These histories can become ‘hidden’ because they are not always recorded, nevertheless, these important social histories often shape us and the places we live, and Manchester Histories are thrilled to be supporting people across Greater Manchester to uncover their own histories. Over the coming months we'll be working with five community groups, plus, with the help of experts, we're developing an informative series of toolkits that will to equip anybody with the skills they need to begin researching and creating their own archives.



Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: History starts to take shape

Monday 5 June 2017

In our second blog on our Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians project, professional archivist, Heather Emily Roberts tells us more about the five community groups we're working with, and gives a taster of what you can expect from their exhibition at the fabulous Archives+ opening later in the year.  

Manchester People First

Starting in 1992, this charity is run by and supports learning disabled adults who campaign for disability rights. Their archive is a huge visual resource of photographs and newsletters which tell its story from the very first day to happenings of the last month. They are designing an exhibition about the charity’s fantastic journey and development and what it has come to mean for those involved. I’m really excited about the content, it’s going to be a great exhibition!

http://www.manpf.org/index.html

M13 Youth Project

Just the simple act of talking to young people on the streets of Ardwick and Longsight led to M13 Youth Project being founded back in 1995. The project has since supported countless of individuals and it is their ethos of “love, think, create, reflect, enjoy, achieve and make a positive difference in their world” that they wish to share via their archive material in the exhibition. This digital display will be interesting not just for its story, but how it’s told. Much of their real work is conversation and much of their real presence is the atmosphere they create. It could make for a very interesting and mixed display.

https://www.m13youthproject.org.uk/

Inspire Centre

This famous hub of Levenshulme life is set in a beautifully renovated United Reformed Church smack bang in the middle of the town’s busiest street. When you walk into the café you can see how diverse and community-driven the local area is. This is the story that Inspire wish tell with their exhibition: the story of Levenshulme as told from inside the walls of this building. From church community to transformation to the current diverse populous, it all happens in these old stone walls.

http://www.lev-inspire.org.uk/

Oldham Youth Council

These young people act as a representative for their Hidden Histories, Oldham Youth Council generation within Oldham Council. They campaign for health, wellbeing and so much more. They are an extremely diverse group of people and they are using the exhibition to explore their own personal family histories, using them to showcase how their different backgrounds come together to make their organisation even stronger, full of understanding and acceptance. There are fascinating stories lined up to share with you in November.

http://oldhamyc.com/

FC United of Manchester

In 2005, fans of Manchester United protested the corporate take-over of the famous club and formed their own community football club. Its Sporting Memories Group members recall playing with the famous Nobby Stiles in the streets of Manchester. They are very proud of North Manchester and its innovations in industry and sport. Their premises are smack bang in the middle of a geographical treasure map of local history with memories and ghosts of landmarks in spitting distance from their grounds. Their exhibition is hoping to highlight some of these forgotten legacies of their area. I’m looking forward to learning a lot!

http://www.fc-utd.co.uk/index.php

Next steps

We are at the second stage of our “collect, curate, create” process and are guiding the groups in putting the stories together within their own exhibition parameters. We’re certainly not short of content! Exhibitions should be ready by the end of summer to be showcased and launched in November.

About me

Heather Emily Roberts, professional archivist and owner of HerArchivist: Archive and Heritage Consultancy.

Website: herarchivist.wordpress.com

Twitter: @herArchivist


Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

Monday 15 May 2017

Inspire Group visit to Archives+Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians is a Manchester Histories project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The project will see Manchester Histories working with communities across Greater Manchester with the aim of revealing less familiar histories and heritage; that is to say, the histories of the people, buildings, families, communities and places that make up our lives.

These histories can become ‘hidden’ because they are not always recorded, nevertheless, these important social histories often shape us and the places we live, and Manchester Histories are thrilled to be supporting people across Greater Manchester to uncover their own histories. Over the coming months we'll be working with five community groups (read more about them in our next blog), plus, with the help of experts, we're developing an informative series of toolkits that will to equip anybody with the skills they need to begin researching and creating their own archives.

In our first blog about the Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians project, professional archivist, Heather Emily Roberts tells us why it is so important to her:

Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians: Why it matters (according to the archivist)

Heather Roberts

I’m Heather, the archivist for this fabulous project. So far, it has been an inspiring adventure into a handful of Manchester’s hidden histories and I’m really excited about what lies ahead. We cannot wait to share with you the outcomes of the hard work of our participating community groups. They are all working hard to create their exhibitions to be displayed at the sensational Archives+ in Manchester Central Library later in the year.

In the meantime, I thought I’d share a couple of thoughts about why I think exhibiting archive material is a great idea. More specifically, why I think community groups and independent projects create such important exhibitions.

Your history, your archives, your exhibition

History is merely a story. Everyone has a different story to tell about any part of history. Usually, the only stories that get remembered and passed on are those that are written down and kept. These then become known as archives.

Archives help tell the story of history, they provide the evidence, the proof, that something happened or someone existed.

This is why it is important for you to keep your own archive. Only you can tell your story, whether that is the story of you as a person, your organisation, your work, your building, your area, whatever. If you don’t tell it, then either someone else tells it for you or no one tells it at all.

Find your archives, keep your archives and then share your archives. Perhaps share them in an exhibition.

Unless you’re going for a Victoriana “cabinet of curiosities” style, exhibitions can be much more than just a showcase of “stuff.” They can be a platform upon which you can proudly perform the story of your chosen history. Think of your history as a story, yourself as the storyteller and your exhibition as the storybook.

Community exhibitions and why they matter

Looking through content

History didn’t happen to times, dates and places and buildings. It happened within them, and it happened to people. It has happened, and continues to happen, to all of us.

We’ve all heard something on the grapevine and thought, “Hang about, that’s not right, it didn’t happen like that.” But what do you do if someone asks,“Can you prove that?” It can be difficult when you have no evidence to produce in a confident flourish of righteousness.

This is why using exhibitions to tell your side of the story is so important. Not only does it give you a voice which you control (i.e. your own), but it bestows validation upon what you’re saying (since you’re providing the proof through archives) and puts you in the context of the wider history of your area and subject.

Our understanding of history is always richer and more fulfilling with more than one voice or narrative to tell of it.

An inspiring project

Obviously, I’m biased when it comes to archives – it is my passion after all. This project has been particularly inspiring for me, as all five of the community groups have very different stories to tell but they are all telling their own story, sharing their own history in their own voices. Hopefully, many more people will be inspired to do the same.

About me: Heather Emily Roberts, professional archivist and owner of HerArchivist: Archive and Heritage Consultancy. Website:herarchivist.wordpress.com 

Twitter: @herArchivist



Tagged in Hidden Histories, Hidden Historians

We use cookies to help us provide you with a better service, but do not track anything that can be used to personally identify you.

If you prefer us not to set these cookies, please visit our Cookie Settings page or continue browsing our site to accept them.